October is a Month to Celebrate Loyal Best Friends

There’s a bad stereotype revolving around rescue dogs: they the ones nobody wants, the misbehaved ones, the biters, the mutts. This is simply not true.

Most shelter dogs ended up where they are because of reasons beyond their control, whether their owner died or family moved away, they were displaced by a new baby, or even if they have a small behavioral issue it’s likely because their former owner didn’t try hard enough to fix it.

Shelter dogs are by no means lesser. (In fact, about 25% of shelter dogs available for adoption are purebreds.) Most are healthy, affectionate animals and will simply need a few readjustments to learn how to fit into your home.

Sure, puppies are fluffy, adorable balls of fur. But they also require a lot of work. House-training requires time and patience. Fresh out of that? Consider an older dog.

Some of the benefits of adopting an older dog include:

They’re easy to train. They’ll be house-trained and better yet, focused and capable of learning new tricks. Additionally you won’t find them nomming on a pair of your favorite kicks. They have manners and likely already know the basic sit, stay, down commands.

WYSIWYG. (Pronounced “wizzy-wig”.) Whereas puppies can grow to unplanned sizes, with an older dog you’ll know their size and personality right away.

They aren’t a 24/7 job. Unlike puppies, older dogs can go several hours without being monitored (granted those puppy pics of a dog covered in feathers and toilet paper are darn cute, but to some also a bit aggravating).

You save their life. At most shelters, older dogs are the last to be adopted and first to be euthanized. Saving them from a kill shelter provides an unparalleled bond (even if you claim you “aren’t a dog person,” trust us, you’ll become one).

No matter which pup you pick, they’re all winners. Big, little, guardian, comedian, purebred, mutt—they’ll be the most loyal, lovable best friend you’ve ever met.

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